er ads

Some company has been plastering with ads featuring the earth-shattering, highly compelling intro “er” and the edge of a letter. So far, it’s anyone’s guess which company is behind it, but I don’t care. The problem for me is that teaser ads should, well… tease. Nothing about this ad tempts me to find out what the “er” stands for, or why I should care.

Bored subway riders are bound to feel relieved or something when the current dumb ads are replaced with the final versions, but the effectiveness of that campaign is going to rely solely on the results. Will anyone really be more impressed by the final ads because of this weak introduction?

For me at least, this just proves again that the art of great is a rare thing, especially in Canada or the U.S. I can’t remember the last time I was really blown away by an ad campaign, but I’m waiting. Go ahead, er, impress me?

About The Author

W. Andrew Powell
Editor-In-Chief

W. Andrew Powell lives, sleeps, eats, and breaths movies and entertainment. Since launching The GATE in 1999 Andrew has enjoyed being a pest to any publicist who would return his calls. In his "spare time," Andrew is also an avid photographer, and writes about leisure travel and hotels around the world.

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3 Responses

  1. Cip

    Now that the teaser is revealed, I wonder if Bell ever considered the numerous interpretations it might have, such as:
    1) ER is the response from their infamous customer service whenever you try to get a problem resolved
    2) Here is certainly a company in need of the Emergency Room, more like the trauma room if you read blogs
    3) New branding that coincides with the texting decision, certainly makes life simpler – If you don’t use text, what it means is that you must pay $60 a year (+ taxes) for the priviledge of not having to deal with customer service to get unwanted messages removed from your bill on a regular basisi. Certainly makes the decision SIMPLER.

    Truth in advertising Eh!