On Saturday, as I was arriving at the hotel to interview the lovely Lisa Ray, I happened to run into Toronto Sun scribe Bruce Kirkland, one of the few writers who makes me want to read said paper.

After some introductions and festival talk with the publicity folks we happened upon that one topic that almost any media type can smile about; that special perk that few will honestly deny: getting a chance to bask in the glow of a beautiful person for a few minutes.

Now, as common as that might sound, it can be a wonderful thing. Ask any member of the press and they’re bound to recall at least one interview where their heart skipped just a bit of a beat, just because they were in the presence of some stunning celebrity. Some celebrities have more of that sparkle than others, especially the ones blessed with intelligence and beauty, but I suppose it’s all a matter of your own special preference.

Both Bruce and I admitted that Lisa was one of those special ones, and he was also fortunate enough to be remembered by Penelope Cruz at the festival.

For me this year’s highlight was probably the long glance I got from Christina Ricci on the red carpet. I actually recall snapping 4 or 5 shots before putting down my camera and noticing that she was still smiling my way (there must have been a photographer still shooting behind me?). My ultimate highlight has to be my Selma Blair interview from 2004 – she was tired and had been interviewed all day long, and yet she still managed to be charming as hell.

I’m sure many writers or interviewers would deny this if you asked them, if nothing else just to show a little professonalism, but the thing is, it’s nothing about being professionals. We wouldn’t get these interviews if we went in and just slobbered all over ourselves. The truth is, this is just one of those perks, and while it’s not a key part of the job, it certainly doesn’t hurt a bit if you ask me.

About The Author

W. Andrew Powell
Editor-In-Chief
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W. Andrew Powell lives, sleeps, eats, and breaths movies and entertainment. Since launching The GATE in 1999 Andrew has enjoyed being a pest to any publicist who would return his calls. In his "spare time," Andrew is also an avid photographer, and writes about leisure travel and hotels around the world.

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