by Wil Powell

Sundance 2023 Review: Landscape with Invisible Hand

Captivatingly strange and sometimes depressingly timely, writer-director Cory Finley’s delightfully idiosyncratic sci-fi satire Landscape with Invisible Hand is a sprawling story of a teenage boy trying to navigate a new world that feels far from normal.

Infinity Pool Review | All Expenses Paid

Smartly realized, psychologically fascinating, and brutally violent, Brandon Cronenberg’s trippy thriller Infinity Pool is the writer-director’s best effort yet.

You People Review | Not-so-ordinary People

A staggeringly unfunny, scattershot, punch pulling, and ineffective satire from a lot of talents who should know better, You People squanders an interesting, boundary pushing premise by constantly taking the lowest, easiest road possible.

Sundance 2023 Review: A Thousand and One

Writer-director A.V. Rockwell’s debut feature, A Thousand and One, is a tremendous, sprawling big city epic contained within an intimately realized, highly detailed family drama that unfolds over the course of more than a decade.

Sundance 2023 Review: Kim’s Video

A playful blend of fact and fantasy, David Redman and Ashley Sabin’s documentary Kim’s Video will speak loudly and proudly to cinephiles and physical media enthusiasts.

Shotgun Wedding Review | No Muss, No Fuss

A suitable antidoted to the midwinter blahs, the action-comedy-romance Shotgun Wedding isn’t anything new, but it sure is a lot more fun than one might expect.

When You Finish Saving the World Review | Persistent and Pushy

For his feature length debut behind the camera, When You Finish Saving the World, writer-director Jesse Eisenberg spins an off-kilter, but well reasoned slice of life centred around two people who are more alike than they would ever want to admit.

Sundance 2023 Review: Shayda

Iranian-Australian filmmaker Noora Niasari’s outstanding first feature, Shayda, is a work of tremendous intensity, warmth, paranoia, and resilience.

Sundance 2023 Review: Iron Butterflies

Ukrainian filmmaker Roman Liubyi’s artful documentary Iron Butterflies looks back to earlier days in their country’s fight against Russia to pay respect to victims of a large scale atrocity that threaten to be forgotten about amid current battles and tensions.

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